Tree Cake History

Lithuanian Tree Cake a.k.a. Sakotis , Raguolis, Bankuxenas also known as       “KING of CAKES”

Baumkuchen is a kind of layered cake. It is a traditional dessert in many countries throughout Europe and is also a popular snack and dessert in Japan. The characteristic rings that appear when sliced resemble tree rings, and give the cake its German name, Baumkuchen, which literally translates to “tree cake” or “log cake”

Lithuanian tree cake Sakotis (branched) or in Lithuanian community more popular as Raguolis    (“spiked”) very popular desert that appears at most traditional Lithuanian weddings ,birthday parties and/or other large parties. Aslo it is becoming a popular among American kids.

In other languages Sakotis has his name as:

  •  Austria – Baumkuchen are known in Austria as Prügelkrapfen
  •  Czech Republic – Popular under the name Trdelnik
  •  Luxembourg – Baumkuchen in Luxembourg, called Baamkuch, has become a traditional dish served mostly on special occasions, such as weddings.
  •  Poland – In Poland it is known with name of Sękacz
  •  Lithuania – Šakotis or Raguolis also popular by adopted German  name with Lithuanian traditional ending” -as”  – Bankuchenas
  • Hungary – Kürtőskalács is a similar cake also cooked on a spit
  • German – Bumkuchen
  • Baumkuchen is one of the most popular pastries in Japan, where it is called baumukūhen (バウムクーヘン?), or often erroneously, bāmukūhen (バームクーヘン?)[citation needed]. It is a popular return present in Japan for wedding guests because of its ring shape.

Aside from its more modern history, Baumkuchen can trace its roots back to Ancient Greece and then Rome, with the Romans bringing the recipe for baking cakes on logs over an open fire.

From German webpage”

There is a great deal of controversy about who invented the Baumkuchen. The Salzwedel region claims to be the originator, but so does the Berlin region. Whatever the outcome of this debate may be – pastries of different layers were baked on wooden sticks as early as in the Greek ancient world. Then, it was in Saxony were this inventive pastry first saw the light of the (pastry) world.

Today the rare art of making a tasty and juicy Baumkuchen knights a baker. Between manufacturers of different regions there are subtle differences to be found that make every cake a different culinary experience. The production of a Baumkuchen demands a large amount of skills and time. Only a few manufacturers are left that still craft their cakes as Corso does.

Baumkuchen in Japan

Baumkuchen is one of the most popular pastries in Japan, where it is called baumukūhen (バウムクーヘン?), or often erroneously, bāmukūhen (バームクーヘン?)[citation needed]. It is a popular return present in Japan for wedding guests because of its ring shape.[6]

It was first introduced to Japan by the German Karl Joseph Wilhelm Juchheim. Juchheim was in the Chinese city of Tsingtao during World War I and when the war ended the Japanese Army removed him and his wife to Japan.[7] Juchheim started making and selling the traditional confection at a German exhibition in Hiroshima in 1919. Continued success allowed him to move to Yokohama and open a bakery-store, but it was destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, thus forcing him to move his operations to Kobe, where he stayed until the end of World War II. Some years later, his wife returned to help a Japanese company open a chain of bakeries under the Juchheim name that further helped spread Baumkuchen’s popularity in Japan and is still in operation.

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